2nd Grade State Standards
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Math
Common Core 2nd Grade Math

Mathematics » Grade 2 » Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

2.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.1

Add and subtract within 20.

2.OA.2. Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.2 By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.

2.OA.3. Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.2.OA.4. Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.

Understand place value.

2.NBT.1.Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:
2.NBT.2. Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100
100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a “hundred.The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
2.NBT.3. Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
2.NBT.4. Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.

2.NBT.5. Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
2.NBT.6. Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
2.NBT.7. Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.
2.NBT.8. Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900.
2.NBT.9. Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work, using place value and the properties of operations.1

Measure and estimate lengths in standard units.

2.MD.1. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.
2.MD.2. Measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.
2.MD.3. Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.
2.MD.4. Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.

Relate addition and subtraction to length.

2.MD.5. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
2.MD.6. Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram.

Work with time and money.

2.MD.7. Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m
2.MD.8. Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?

Represent and interpret data.

2.MD.9. Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit, or by making repeated measurements of the same object. Show the measurements by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units.

2.MD.10. Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems1 using information presented in a bar graph.

Reason with shapes and their attributes.

2.G.1. Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces.1 Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.

2.G.2. Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of them.

2.G.3. Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.



Science
Nature of ScienceIndicator 1: Understand the nature and origin of scientific knowledge.
Note: Mastery is not expected at these grade levels.
Indicator 2: Apply the skills necessary to conduct scientific investigations.
Note: Mastery is not expected at these grade levels.Physical Science2.P.1.1. Students are able to classify solids in terms of the materials they are made of and their physical properties.
2.P.1.2. Students are able to describe visually observable properties of liquids and classify liquids by their physical properties.
2.P.1.3. Students are able to identify mixtures of solid substances and ways to separate them.
2.P.2.1. Students are able to demonstrate how moving objects exhibit different types of motion.
2.P.2.2. Students are able to predict the effects of magnets on other magnets and other objects.
2.P.3.1. Students are able to compare sounds in terms of high pitch, low pitch, loud and soft (volume).
Life Science
2.L.1.1. Students are able to classify plants according to similarities and differences.
2.L.1.2. Students are able to classify people and animals according to similarities and differences.
2.L.2.1. Students are able to describe how flowering plants go through a series of orderly changes in their life cycle.
2.L.2.2. Students are able to compare life cycles of various living things.
2.L.3.1. Students are able to describe ways that plants and animals depend on each other.
2.L.3.2. Students are able to associate adaptations in plants and animals in response to seasonal changes.
2.L.3.3. Students are able to recognize what it means for a species to be extinct or endangered.
Earth and Space
2.E.1.1. Students are able to describe types and patterns of weather during different seasons.
2.E.1.2. Students are able to identify and locate geological features using maps and globes.
2.E.1.3. Students are able to recognize and distinguish between forms of water in the Earth system.

Social Studies
United States History
2.US.1.1. Students are able to place important historical events in the order in which they occurred.
2.US.1.2. Students are able to compare features of modern-day living (food, shelter, clothing, transportation) to those of the past.
2.US.1.3. Students are able to describe ways historical figures contributed to modern-day life.
2.US.2.1. Students are able to compare ways different cultures shared traditions.
World History
2.W.2.1. Students are able to compare holidays celebrated in different countries.
Geography
2.G.1.1. Students are able to construct a simple aerial view map of the classroom using a map key/legend and at least five symbols.
2.G.1.2. Students are able to use simple map reading skills to identify the map title, label four directions on a compass rose, and interpret the symbols of a map key/legend.
Civics/Government
2.C.1.1. Students are able to explain the difference between rules and laws.
2.C.1.2. Students are able to identify why laws are needed in a community and why there are legal consequences for lawbreakers.
2.C.1.3. Students are able to explain the basic political roles of leaders in the larger community.
2.C.2.1. Students are able to describe the meaning of majority rule and its related function in a democracy.
Economics
2.E.1.1. Students are able to identify the differences between natural resources and human resources and how they are used.
2.E.1.2. Students are able to explain the importance of making informed decisions about spending, borrowing, and saving.



Standards From:
http://doe.sd.gov/contentstandards/

image from:
http://www.fotosearch.com/clip-art/frog.html